//
archives

Peyto

I am passionate about making science, sustainability, and sport accessible through engaging information and activities. Peyto is a reference to Bill Peyto who was an outfitter, trapper, and eventually a park warden in Banff National Park. Peyto Lake and Peyto Glacier are both named after him. He is also a distant relative of mine.
Peyto has written 162 posts for Connecting with Science

Do you have a concussion? Try testing your spit

For anyone who has had to do first aid on someone after they hit their head or make a decision about an athlete’s ability to continue to participate, or if you have had to decide yourself whether or not you may be suffering from a concussion yourself you know how much of a guessing game … Continue reading

Using DNA to see what bees do

To be honest, I had never thought about what we would do if bees and other pollinators disappear, despite knowing that they are currently under threat. But how do plants that depend on pollinators reproduce if the pollinators disappear? In various places throughout history, people had had to go out with tiny paint brushes and … Continue reading

Icing to increase flexibility?

I stumbled across an article today that seems to go against what I have always understood about stretching and flexibility. I have always been taught that to truly stretch you need to warm up your muscles first. Typically this was done by working the muscles at a lower intensity but I remember a physiotherapist telling … Continue reading

The origin of elements

Check out this article about the periodic table that two astronomers modified to show the origins of the different elements in your body. https://www.sciencealert.com/this-awesome-periodic-table-shows-the-origins-of-every-atom-in-your-body

What does it mean to be a carrier?

One of the things that my biology students often struggle with is what exactly does it mean to be a carrier for a particular trait. This is a difficult concept because it seems odd that we might have the information in our DNA for a trait such as a disease but we don’t actually have … Continue reading

Would a park in your neighbourhood make you bike more or less?

In my Master’s research, I examined the impact of urban greenspaces on decisions to move into the suburbs. It had a significant effect being one of the top three reasons why individuals chose to live on the outskirts of Edmonton. I, on the other hand, prefer to live closer to the centre of Edmonton, but … Continue reading

Bike lanes: Separated or not?

I haven’t been able to ride my bike outside since my crash over two years ago, but I miss it. What I don’t miss is the feeling that I can’t trust the drivers on the road next to me. But here’s the thing, I was on a separated path when my crash happened because a … Continue reading

Asthma, neurons, and the immune system

I still remember my first asthma attack. It’s a pretty terrifying feeling and one that I have worked hard against. The more I improve my cardiovascular system, the harder I’m able to push without feeling asthma’s grasp. But I’m lucky. I am able to train and improve but asthma can be debilitating. And while we … Continue reading

Pigeons are better at multitasking

I feel like these days people claim their ability to multitask as a badge of honour. Eventually, it will degrade to a playground quality fight: “Yeah, well I have ten different windows open on my computer and I’m simultaneously leading a meeting while attending a webinar that is vital to my field.” When I am … Continue reading

Does the cyclist or the equipment matter more?

There are many ways that a person can modify a bike to give themselves an advantage and with two major cycling events (Tour of Alberta – road cycling and FISE world action sports festival – a couple different BMX events and mountain bike slope style) in Edmonton in September these modifications have been on my … Continue reading

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 264 other followers

Follow me on Twitter