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Biology, Psychology

The wake up light works for me

Last summer I looked into the research on wake up lights. As a very not morning person who goes to work early every day I was looking for any sort of tool that could make the morning more bearable. Based on what I learned (you can read the post here) I took the chance and ordered myself a wake up light. I went for a more expensive one because it had a little more flexibility in the time it takes to wake you up, includes more of the visible light spectrum, and had a go to sleep feature where it slowly turns the light off. And I love it!

I still don’t necessarily like getting up in the morning but I’m not in a grumpy, I hate the world mood when it goes off. I also haven’t slept through the alarm once which I used to do frequently. In fact, when my husband has to get up and I don’t I request that we use the wake up light over his alarm even though I’m the one who has to turn the alarm off then. I even sometimes smile in the morning now, which, believe me, did not happen before.

And the go to sleep light is also a great feature. I feel like I’m getting to sleep faster and staying asleep longer. Which is probably one of the reasons I don’t hate everything when the alarm does go off in the morning.

On the other hand, my husband who is way more of a morning person is somewhat indifferent to the light. But has said that he thinks it is a little easier to wake up to. Of course, that might have more to do with not having your significant other hating the world than an actual direct response to the light.

So, based on the research I read before, and my own personal experience I would highly recommend a wake up light (and go to sleep light) for individuals who grudgingly get out of bed in the morning and grudgingly go to sleep at night.

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About Peyto

I am passionate about making science, sustainability, and sport accessible through engaging information and activities. Peyto is a reference to Bill Peyto who was an outfitter, trapper, and eventually a park warden in Banff National Park. Peyto Lake and Peyto Glacier are both named after him. He is also a distant relative of mine.

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